Consistent Resources

Toiminnan tabletti samoin Cialis Levitra, mutta sen avulla voit saada enemmän pysyvää vaikutusta Osta Levitra Lääkitys imeytyy nopeasti, se edistää veren virtausta penikseen ja auttaa rentoutumista sileä syvä lihaksia.

» Posted by on Sep 5, 2014 in Industry Postings, Travel Professional Resources | 0 comments

While the course materials state “It is reassuring, especially when implementing new systems, that a virtually unlimited supply of information is available electronically,” the quality of multiple resources that might overlap in purpose can cause more confusion than clarity if the messages provided conflict, or even if they simply provide the same information using different language.

Undoubtedly, intentional obfuscation is not the desire of any program attempting to increase the numbers of people and agencies adopting it. But relying on a variety of involved parties to be responsible for creating and disseminating information pertinent to their respective roles in the travel/purchasing process lends itself to potential misunderstanding. What sources are the most authoritative? Which sources do the best job explaining fundamental policies and procedures? Is there a central repository providing links to all of the resources available and indicating which might override others in the event of conflicting information?

Many of us work in environments in which we have access to shared folders on secure intranet systems. The intention of these shared folders is to serve as just such a repository for the vital information necessary to meet our daily responsibilities and provide consistency among practices of the individuals within the organization. However, we typically find in these shared folders un-purged and outdated forms and file that litter the virtual landscape intended to help us. These systems are only as effective as the information that is initially provided and maintained over time.

Publicizing the existence of a “virtually unlimited supply of information” from various sources is helpful, but relying on any one of them to be the most authoritative could result in faulty assumptions.

Mark Feggeler

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