Keeping Airlines and Passengers Safe

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» Posted by on Dec 7, 2014 in Airlines | 0 comments

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has implemented a Secure Flight Program that requires passengers to provide their name as it appears on their government issued identification when traveling and making airline reservations.  The program has gone further in a second phase by asking passengers to enter their date of birth and gender when making their reservations. Since Secure Flight is a process that goes behind the scenes to match to watch lists this happens before passengers arrive at the airport, current security checkpoint procedures remain the same.  Failure to provide the information could result in delays at check-in.

Secure Flight is a key tool in confirming that someone identified as a ‘No Fly’ does not receive a boarding pass.  Secure Flight will make travel safer and easier for passengers.  By providing the additional data elements of gender and date of birth, Secure Flight will more effectively help prevent misidentification of passengers who have similar names to individuals on a watch list and better identify individuals that may pose a threat to aviation. Individuals requesting access to secure areas in U.S. airports to assist a passenger to the gate will also be asked to provide their full name, date of birth and gender when requesting a gate pass from the airline ticket agent.

The Secure Flight program satisfies a key recommendation of the 9/11 Commission, congressional requirements from the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004, and the 9/11 Commission Act signed into law in 2007.  TSA must ensure known or suspected terrorists are unable to obtain a boarding pass to mitigate risks.

By:  Debbie Hardman

“The views expressed are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the position of the Bureau of the Government or my Agency.”

 

 

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